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Open Access 04-05-2024 | Theophylline | Original Contribution

Self-reported caffeine consumption miss-matched consumption measured by plasma levels of caffeine and its metabolites: results from two population-based studies

Authors: Nermine Laaboub, Setareh Ranjbar, Marie-Pierre F. Strippoli, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Sandrine Estoppey-Younes, Belen Ponte, Menno Pruijm, Bruno Vogt, Nicolas Ansermot, Séverine Crettol, Frederik Vandenberghe, Peter Vollenweider, Martin Preisig, Murielle Bochud, Chin B. EAP

Published in: European Journal of Nutrition

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Abstract

Importance and objective

Self-reported caffeine consumption has been widely used in research while it may be subject to bias. We sought to investigate the associations between self-reported caffeine consumption and plasma levels of caffeine and its two main metabolites (paraxanthine and theophylline) in the community.

Methods

Data from two population-based studies (SKIPOGH1 and 2 (N = 1246) and CoLaus|PsyCoLaus (N = 4461)) conducted in Switzerland were used. Self-reported caffeine consumption was assessed using questionnaires. Plasma levels of caffeine and its metabolites were quantified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer.

Results

In both studies, mean log plasma levels of caffeine and its two metabolites were over 6.48 (plasma levels = 652 ng/ml) when no caffeine consumption was reported. Subsequently, nonlinear associations between log plasma levels and self-reported caffeine consumption were observed in SKIPOGH, with a change of the slope at 3–5 cups of espresso per day in SKIPOGH1 but not SKIPOGH2. In CoLaus|PsyCoLaus, increased daily consumption of caffeinated beverages was associated with increased log plasma levels with a change of the slope at 3 cups. In both studies, declared caffeine consumption higher than 3–5 cups per day was not associated with higher plasma levels of caffeine and its metabolites.

Conclusion

Self-reports of no or low caffeine consumption and consumption of more than 3–5 cups of coffee should be interpreted with caution, with possible under- or over-estimation. Quantifying plasma levels of caffeine and its metabolites may contribute to a better estimation of caffeine intake.
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Metadata
Title
Self-reported caffeine consumption miss-matched consumption measured by plasma levels of caffeine and its metabolites: results from two population-based studies
Authors
Nermine Laaboub
Setareh Ranjbar
Marie-Pierre F. Strippoli
Pedro Marques-Vidal
Sandrine Estoppey-Younes
Belen Ponte
Menno Pruijm
Bruno Vogt
Nicolas Ansermot
Séverine Crettol
Frederik Vandenberghe
Peter Vollenweider
Martin Preisig
Murielle Bochud
Chin B. EAP
Publication date
04-05-2024
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Keyword
Theophylline
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition
Print ISSN: 1436-6207
Electronic ISSN: 1436-6215
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-024-03351-9
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