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Published in: Journal of Religion and Health 2/2024

21-01-2024 | Suicide | ORIGINAL PAPER

Developing a Suicide Crisis Response Team in America: An Islamic Perspective

Authors: Rania Awaad, Zuha Durrani, Yasmeen Quadri, Munjireen S. Sifat, Anwar Hussein, Taimur Kouser, Osama El-Gabalawy, Neshwa Rajeh, Sana Shareef

Published in: Journal of Religion and Health | Issue 2/2024

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Abstract

Suicide is a critical public health issue in the United States, recognized as the tenth leading cause of death across all age groups (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020). Despite the Islamic prohibition on suicide, suicidal ideation and suicide mortality persist among Muslim populations. Recent data suggest that U.S. Muslim adults are particularly vulnerable, with a higher attempt history compared to respondents from other faith traditions. While the underlying reasons for this vulnerability are unclear, it is evident that culturally and religiously congruent mental health services can be utilized to steer suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention in Muslim communities across the United States. However, the development of Suicide Response toolkits specific to Muslim populations is currently limited. As a result, Muslim communities lack a detailed framework to appropriately respond in the event of a suicide tragedy. This paper aims to fill this gap in the literature by providing structured guidelines for the formation of a Crisis Response Team (CRT) through an Islamic lens. The CRT comprises of a group of individuals who are strategically positioned to respond to a suicide tragedy. Ideally, the team will include religious leaders, mental health professionals, healthcare providers, social workers, and community leaders. The proposed guidelines are designed to be culturally and religiously congruent and take into account the unique cultural and religious factors that influence Muslim communities' responses to suicide. By equipping key personnel in Muslim communities with the resources to intervene in an emergent situation, provide support to those affected, and mobilize community members to assist in prevention efforts, this model can help save lives and prevent future suicide tragedies in Muslim communities across the United States.
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Metadata
Title
Developing a Suicide Crisis Response Team in America: An Islamic Perspective
Authors
Rania Awaad
Zuha Durrani
Yasmeen Quadri
Munjireen S. Sifat
Anwar Hussein
Taimur Kouser
Osama El-Gabalawy
Neshwa Rajeh
Sana Shareef
Publication date
21-01-2024
Publisher
Springer US
Keywords
Suicide
Suicide
Published in
Journal of Religion and Health / Issue 2/2024
Print ISSN: 0022-4197
Electronic ISSN: 1573-6571
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-023-01993-3

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