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26-07-2023 | Subarachnoid Hemorrhage | Research

Neurobehavioral Impairments Predict Specific Cerebral Damage in Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Authors: Daniel G. Lynch, Kevin A. Shah, Keren Powell, Steven Wadolowski, Willians Tambo, Joshua J. Strohl, Prashin Unadkat, David Eidelberg, Patricio T. Huerta, Chunyan Li

Published in: Translational Stroke Research

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Abstract

Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a severe form of stroke that can cause unpredictable and diffuse cerebral damage, which is difficult to detect until it becomes irreversible. Therefore, there is a need for a reliable method to identify dysfunctional regions and initiate treatment before permanent damage occurs. Neurobehavioral assessments have been suggested as a possible tool to detect and approximately localize dysfunctional cerebral regions. In this study, we hypothesized that a neurobehavioral assessment battery could be a sensitive and specific method for detecting damage in discrete cerebral regions following SAH. To test this hypothesis, a behavioral battery was employed at multiple time points after SAH induced via an endovascular perforation, and brain damage was confirmed via postmortem histopathological analysis. Our results demonstrate that impairment of sensorimotor function accurately predict damage in the cerebral cortex (AUC 0.905; sensitivity 81.8%; specificity 90.9%) and striatum (AUC 0.913; sensitivity 90.1%; specificity 100%), while impaired novel object recognition is a more accurate indicator of damage to the hippocampus (AUC 0.902; sensitivity 74.1%; specificity 83.3%) than impaired reference memory (AUC 0.746; sensitivity 72.2%; specificity 58.0%). Tests for anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors predict damage to the amygdala (AUC 0.900; sensitivity 77.0%; specificity 81.7%) and thalamus (AUC 0.963; sensitivity 86.3%; specificity 87.8%), respectively. This study suggests that recurring behavioral testing can accurately predict damage in specific brain regions, which could be developed into a clinical battery for early detection of SAH damage in humans, potentially improving early treatment and outcomes.
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Literature
64.
go back to reference Gonzalez NR, Boscardin WJ, Glenn T, Vinuela F, Martin NA. Vasospasm probability index: a combination of transcranial doppler velocities, cerebral blood flow, and clinical risk factors to predict cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. J Neurosurg. 2007;107(6):1101–12. https://doi.org/10.3171/JNS-07/12/1101.CrossRefPubMed Gonzalez NR, Boscardin WJ, Glenn T, Vinuela F, Martin NA. Vasospasm probability index: a combination of transcranial doppler velocities, cerebral blood flow, and clinical risk factors to predict cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. J Neurosurg. 2007;107(6):1101–12. https://​doi.​org/​10.​3171/​JNS-07/​12/​1101.CrossRefPubMed
Metadata
Title
Neurobehavioral Impairments Predict Specific Cerebral Damage in Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Authors
Daniel G. Lynch
Kevin A. Shah
Keren Powell
Steven Wadolowski
Willians Tambo
Joshua J. Strohl
Prashin Unadkat
David Eidelberg
Patricio T. Huerta
Chunyan Li
Publication date
26-07-2023
Publisher
Springer US
Published in
Translational Stroke Research
Print ISSN: 1868-4483
Electronic ISSN: 1868-601X
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12975-023-01180-2