Skip to main content
Top
Published in:

Open Access 16-01-2024 | Original Contribution

Post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates following the ingestion of pea-derived protein do not differ from ingesting an equivalent amount of milk-derived protein in healthy, young males

Authors: Philippe J. M. Pinckaers, Joey S. J. Smeets, Imre W. K. Kouw, Joy P. B. Goessens, Annemarie P. B. Gijsen, Lisette C. P. G. M. de Groot, Lex. B. Verdijk, Luc J. C. van Loon, Tim Snijders

Published in: European Journal of Nutrition | Issue 3/2024

Login to get access

Abstract

Purpose

Plant-derived proteins have received considerable attention as an alternative to animal-derived proteins. However, plant-derived proteins are considered to have less anabolic properties when compared with animal-derived proteins. The lower muscle protein synthesis rates following ingestion of plant- compared with animal-derived protein have been attributed to the lower essential amino acid content of plant-derived proteins and/or their specific amino acid deficiencies. This study aimed to compare post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates following the ingestion of 30 g pea-derived protein with 30 g milk-derived protein in healthy, young males.

Methods

In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group design, 24 young males (24 ± 3 y) received a primed continuous L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine infusion after which they ingested 30 g pea (PEA) or 30 g milk-derived protein (MILK). Blood and muscle biopsies were collected frequently for 5 h to assess post-prandial plasma amino acid profiles and subsequent post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates.

Results

MILK increased plasma essential amino acid concentrations more than PEA over the 5 h post-prandial period (incremental area under curve 151 ± 31 vs 102 ± 15 mmol∙300 min∙L−1, respectively; P < 0.001). Ingestion of both MILK and PEA showed a robust muscle protein synthetic response with no significant differences between treatments (0.053 ± 0.013 and 0.053 ± 0.017%∙h−1, respectively; P = 0.96).

Conclusion

Post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates following the ingestion of 30 g pea-derived protein do not differ from the response following ingestion of an equivalent amount of milk-derived protein. International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (NTR6548; 27–06-2017).
Appendix
Available only for authorised users
Literature
20.
go back to reference Wilkinson SB, Tarnopolsky MA, Macdonald MJ, Macdonald JR, Armstrong D, Phillips SM (2007) Consumption of fluid skim milk promotes greater muscle protein accretion after resistance exercise than does consumption of an isonitrogenous and isoenergetic soy-protein beverage. Am J Clin Nutr 85:1031–1040. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/85.4.1031CrossRefPubMed Wilkinson SB, Tarnopolsky MA, Macdonald MJ, Macdonald JR, Armstrong D, Phillips SM (2007) Consumption of fluid skim milk promotes greater muscle protein accretion after resistance exercise than does consumption of an isonitrogenous and isoenergetic soy-protein beverage. Am J Clin Nutr 85:1031–1040. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1093/​ajcn/​85.​4.​1031CrossRefPubMed
22.
go back to reference Churchward-Venne TA, Pinckaers PJM, Smeets JSJ, Peeters WM, Zorenc AH, Schierbeek H, Rollo I, Verdijk LB, van Loon LJC (2019) Myofibrillar and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates do not differ in young men following the ingestion of carbohydrate with whey, soy, or leucine-enriched soy protein after concurrent resistance- and endurance-type exercise. J Nutr 149:210–220. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxy251CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Churchward-Venne TA, Pinckaers PJM, Smeets JSJ, Peeters WM, Zorenc AH, Schierbeek H, Rollo I, Verdijk LB, van Loon LJC (2019) Myofibrillar and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates do not differ in young men following the ingestion of carbohydrate with whey, soy, or leucine-enriched soy protein after concurrent resistance- and endurance-type exercise. J Nutr 149:210–220. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1093/​jn/​nxy251CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
23.
go back to reference Pinckaers PJM, Kouw IWK, Hendriks FK, Van Kranenburg JMX, De Groot LCPGM, Verdijk LB, Snijders T, Van Loon LJC (2021) No differences in muscle protein synthesis rates following ingestion of wheat protein, milk protein, and their protein blend in healthy, young males. British J Nutr. https://doi.org/10.1017/s0007114521000635CrossRef Pinckaers PJM, Kouw IWK, Hendriks FK, Van Kranenburg JMX, De Groot LCPGM, Verdijk LB, Snijders T, Van Loon LJC (2021) No differences in muscle protein synthesis rates following ingestion of wheat protein, milk protein, and their protein blend in healthy, young males. British J Nutr. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1017/​s000711452100063​5CrossRef
25.
30.
go back to reference Kouw IWK, Pinckaers PJM, Le Bourgot C, van Kranenburg JMX, Zorenc AH, de Groot LCPGM, Verdijk L, Snijders T, van Loon LJC (2021) Ingestion of an ample amount of meat substitute based on a lysine-enriched, plant-based protein blend stimulates postprandial muscle protein synthesis to a similar extent as an isonitrogenous amount of chicken in healthy, young men. Br J Nutr. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114521004906CrossRefPubMed Kouw IWK, Pinckaers PJM, Le Bourgot C, van Kranenburg JMX, Zorenc AH, de Groot LCPGM, Verdijk L, Snijders T, van Loon LJC (2021) Ingestion of an ample amount of meat substitute based on a lysine-enriched, plant-based protein blend stimulates postprandial muscle protein synthesis to a similar extent as an isonitrogenous amount of chicken in healthy, young men. Br J Nutr. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1017/​S000711452100490​6CrossRefPubMed
32.
go back to reference WHO/FAO/UNU Expert Consultation (2007) Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition. WHO Techn Rep Ser 935:1–265 WHO/FAO/UNU Expert Consultation (2007) Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition. WHO Techn Rep Ser 935:1–265
33.
go back to reference Pinckaers PJM, Kouw IWK, Gorissen SHM, Houben LHP, Senden JM, Wodzig WKHW, de Groot LCPGM, Verdijk LB, Snijders T, van Loon LJC (2022) The muscle protein synthetic response to the ingestion of a plant-derived protein blend does not differ from an equivalent amount of milk protein in healthy young males. J Nutr. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxac222CrossRefPubMedCentral Pinckaers PJM, Kouw IWK, Gorissen SHM, Houben LHP, Senden JM, Wodzig WKHW, de Groot LCPGM, Verdijk LB, Snijders T, van Loon LJC (2022) The muscle protein synthetic response to the ingestion of a plant-derived protein blend does not differ from an equivalent amount of milk protein in healthy young males. J Nutr. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1093/​jn/​nxac222CrossRefPubMedCentral
34.
go back to reference Bergstrom J (1975) Percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle in physiological and clinical research. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 35:609–616CrossRefPubMed Bergstrom J (1975) Percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle in physiological and clinical research. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 35:609–616CrossRefPubMed
35.
go back to reference Jones DB (1941) Factors for converting percentages of nitrogen in foods and feeds into percentages of protein. US Dep Agric-circular Ser 183:1–21 Jones DB (1941) Factors for converting percentages of nitrogen in foods and feeds into percentages of protein. US Dep Agric-circular Ser 183:1–21
38.
go back to reference Schierbeek H. Mass spectrometry and stable isotopes in nutritional and pediatric research. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc; 2017. p. 56–61. Schierbeek H. Mass spectrometry and stable isotopes in nutritional and pediatric research. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc; 2017. p. 56–61.
49.
go back to reference Gilani GS, Cockell KA, Sepehr E (2005) Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods. J AOAC Int 88:967–987CrossRefPubMed Gilani GS, Cockell KA, Sepehr E (2005) Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods. J AOAC Int 88:967–987CrossRefPubMed
Metadata
Title
Post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates following the ingestion of pea-derived protein do not differ from ingesting an equivalent amount of milk-derived protein in healthy, young males
Authors
Philippe J. M. Pinckaers
Joey S. J. Smeets
Imre W. K. Kouw
Joy P. B. Goessens
Annemarie P. B. Gijsen
Lisette C. P. G. M. de Groot
Lex. B. Verdijk
Luc J. C. van Loon
Tim Snijders
Publication date
16-01-2024
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition / Issue 3/2024
Print ISSN: 1436-6207
Electronic ISSN: 1436-6215
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-023-03295-6

Other articles of this Issue 3/2024

European Journal of Nutrition 3/2024 Go to the issue
Obesity Clinical Trial Summary

At a glance: The STEP trials

A round-up of the STEP phase 3 clinical trials evaluating semaglutide for weight loss in people with overweight or obesity.

Developed by: Springer Medicine
Webinar | 06-02-2024 | 20:00 (CET)

Mastering chronic pancreatitis pain: A multidisciplinary approach and practical solutions

Severe pain is the most common symptom of chronic pancreatitis. In this webinar, experts share the latest insights in pain management for chronic pancreatitis patients. Experts from a range of disciplines discuss pertinent cases and provide practical suggestions for use within clinical practice.

Sponsored by: Viatris

Developed by: Springer Healthcare
Live Webinar | 01-10-2024 | 12:30 (CEST)

Recent advances in the use of CAR T-cell therapies in relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma

Live: Tuesday 1st October 2024, 12:30-14:00 (CEST)

In this live webinar, Professor Martin Dreyling and an esteemed, international panel of CAR-T experts will discuss the very latest data on the safety, efficacy and clinical impact of CAR T-cell therapies in the treatment of r/r DLBCL and r/r FL, as presented at ASH 2023, EU CAR-T 2024, and EHA 2024. 

Please note, this webinar is not intended for healthcare professionals based in the US and UK.

Sponsored by: Novartis Pharma AG

Chaired by: Prof. Martin Dreyling
Developed by: Springer Healthcare