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Open Access 07-02-2024 | Parkinson's Disease | Review

Targeting exercise intensity and aerobic training to improve outcomes in Parkinson’s disease

Authors: Tone Ricardo Benevides Panassollo, Grant Mawston, Denise Taylor, Sue Lord

Published in: Sport Sciences for Health

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Abstract

Aerobic training is popular for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) given its potential to improve aerobic capacity, relieve symptoms, and to stabilise disease progression. Although current evidence supports some of the assertions surrounding this view, the effect of exercise intensity on PD is currently unclear. Reasons for this include inconsistent reporting of exercise intensity, training regimes based on general guidelines rather than individualised physiological markers, poor correspondence between intended exercise intensities and training zones, and lack of awareness of autonomic disturbance in PD and its impact on training regimes and outcome. We also consider the selective effect of exercise intensity on motor symptoms, function and disease progression. We review aerobic training protocols and recent guidelines for people with PD, highlighting their limitations. Considering this, we make suggestions for a more selective and discerning approach to aerobic training programming.
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Metadata
Title
Targeting exercise intensity and aerobic training to improve outcomes in Parkinson’s disease
Authors
Tone Ricardo Benevides Panassollo
Grant Mawston
Denise Taylor
Sue Lord
Publication date
07-02-2024
Publisher
Springer Milan
Published in
Sport Sciences for Health
Print ISSN: 1824-7490
Electronic ISSN: 1825-1234
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11332-024-01165-0