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Published in: Sport Sciences for Health 2/2022

18-09-2021 | Original Article

Nano branched-chain amino acids enhance the effect of uphill (concentric) and downhill (eccentric) treadmill exercise on muscle gene expression of Akt and mTOR on aged rats

Authors: Salimeh Sadri, Gholamreza Sharifi, Khosro Jalali Dehkordi

Published in: Sport Sciences for Health | Issue 2/2022

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Abstract

Aim

This study was aimed to consider the effects of uphill (concentric, CON) and downhill (eccentric, ECC) treadmill exercise with Nano-BCAA supplementation on muscle protein expression of Akt and mTOR.

Methods

Thirty aging male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of (n = 5 each group): control (healthy), uphill running (CON, 0 to + 15°), downhill running (ECC, 0 to − 15°), Nano-BCAA (BCAA with Nano-Chitosan), CON + Nano-BCAA, and ECC + Nano-BCAA. The exercise training was performed in an interval form, with 3 sessions per weeks lasting 8 weeks. BCAA (in Nano form) administered by gavage 3 sessions per week for 8 weeks. RT-PCR was used to measure gene expression of Akt and mTOR. As well, protein expression of mTOR was performed by the IHC method.

Results

Administration of BCAA with CON and ECC increased the Akt gene expression (p < 0.05). Co-treatment of Nano-BCAA and exercises leads to much higher values of Akt than does single treatment. Compared to the healthy control group (without Nano-BCAA), co-treatment of CON + Nano-BCAA and ECC + Nano-BCAA showed a significant increase in the mTOR gene expression (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

The use of walking exercises, especially with a negative or positive slope, along with proper nutrition (taking healthy supplements such as BCAA) could be effective in strengthening muscle tissue, especially at the cellular level (increasing the Akt/mTOR activity). It can be an optimal alternative for those who cannot use resistance training at old age.
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Metadata
Title
Nano branched-chain amino acids enhance the effect of uphill (concentric) and downhill (eccentric) treadmill exercise on muscle gene expression of Akt and mTOR on aged rats
Authors
Salimeh Sadri
Gholamreza Sharifi
Khosro Jalali Dehkordi
Publication date
18-09-2021
Publisher
Springer Milan
Published in
Sport Sciences for Health / Issue 2/2022
Print ISSN: 1824-7490
Electronic ISSN: 1825-1234
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11332-021-00828-6

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