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08-06-2024 | Myocardial Infarction | Research

Inhibition of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activity Improves Cognitive Function in Mice Subjected to Myocardial Infarction

Authors: Yibo Yin, Xin Li, Xiaoxua Zhang, Xinru Yuan, Xingji You, Jingxiang Wu

Published in: Cardiovascular Toxicology

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Abstract

Cognitive impairment is a commonly observed complication following myocardial infarction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. The most recent research suggests that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) plays a critical role in the development and occurrence of cognitive dysfunction-related diseases. This study aims to explore whether the ERK inhibitor U0126 targets the ERK/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) pathway to ameliorate cognitive impairment after myocardial infarction. To establish a mouse model of myocardial infarction, we utilized various techniques including Echocardiography, Hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining, Elisa, Open field test, Elevated plus maze test, and Western blot analysis to assess mouse cardiac function, cognitive function, and signal transduction pathways. For further investigation into the mechanisms of cognitive function and signal transduction, we administered the ERK inhibitor U0126 via intraperitoneal injection. Reduced total distance and activity range were observed in mice subjected to myocardial infarction during the open field test, along with decreased exploration of the open arms in the elevated plus maze test. However, U0126 treatment exhibited a significant improvement in cognitive decline, indicating a protective effect through the inhibition of the ERK/STAT1 signaling pathway. Hence, this study highlights the involvement of the ERK/STAT1 pathway in regulating cognitive dysfunction following myocardial infarction and establishes U0126 as a promising therapeutic target.
Literature
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go back to reference Schievink, S. H. J., van Boxtel, M. P. J., Deckers, K., van Oostenbrugge, R. J., Verhey, F. R. J., & Köhler, S. (2017). Cognitive changes in prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease: A 12-year follow-up in the Maastricht Aging Study (MAAS). European Heart Journal. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehx365CrossRef Schievink, S. H. J., van Boxtel, M. P. J., Deckers, K., van Oostenbrugge, R. J., Verhey, F. R. J., & Köhler, S. (2017). Cognitive changes in prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease: A 12-year follow-up in the Maastricht Aging Study (MAAS). European Heart Journal. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1093/​eurheartj/​ehx365CrossRef
Metadata
Title
Inhibition of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activity Improves Cognitive Function in Mice Subjected to Myocardial Infarction
Authors
Yibo Yin
Xin Li
Xiaoxua Zhang
Xinru Yuan
Xingji You
Jingxiang Wu
Publication date
08-06-2024
Publisher
Springer US
Published in
Cardiovascular Toxicology
Print ISSN: 1530-7905
Electronic ISSN: 1559-0259
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12012-024-09877-y
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