Skip to main content
Top
Published in: European Journal of Applied Physiology 5/2024

Open Access 29-12-2023 | Massage | Original Article

Acute self-myofascial release modulates cardiac autonomic function and hemodynamic parameters at rest and reduces cardiovascular stress reaction

Authors: Sascha Ketelhut, Livia Oechslin, Cäcilia Zehnder, Claudia Kubica, Claudio R. Nigg

Published in: European Journal of Applied Physiology | Issue 5/2024

Login to get access

Abstract

Purpose

Self-myofascial release (SMR) is a form of self-massage aiming to release tension, improve blood flow, and alleviate muscle soreness. This study aimed to determine whether a single session of SMR could impact cardiovascular parameters at rest and during a cold pressor test (CPT).

Methods

Twenty male participants (aged 26 ± 2 years) underwent a 20-min SMR and a 20-min seated control condition (CON) on two separate test days in a randomized order. Peripheral and central blood pressure (BP), total peripheral resistance (TPR), pulse wave velocity (PWV), heart rate (HR), root mean square of successive RR interval differences (RMSSD), and the quotient of low-frequency power and high-frequency power (LF/HF) were measured both at rest and during a CPT before (t0), 2 min (t1), and 20 min (t2) after the SMR and CON.

Results

Time × condition interactions could be detected for peripheral and central diastolic BP, TPR, HR, and RMSSD. Following the SMR, peripheral diastolic BP, central diastolic BP, TPR, and RMSSD were reduced, while HR was increased compared to the CON. Regarding the CPT time × condition interactions could be detected for peripheral, and central diastolic BP, with lower values after SMR.

Conclusion

The results of the present study suggest that a single bout of SMR confers favorable cardiovascular benefits in healthy normotensive individuals. Furthermore, SMR can attenuate the hemodynamic reactivity to a stress test. Future research should address whether regular SMR leads to chronic adaptations similar to regular, moderate aerobic exercise, massage therapy, and static stretching.
Literature
go back to reference Jay K, Sundstrup E, Søndergaard SD et al (2014) Specific and cross over effects of massage for muscle soreness. Int J Phys Ther 9:82–91 Jay K, Sundstrup E, Søndergaard SD et al (2014) Specific and cross over effects of massage for muscle soreness. Int J Phys Ther 9:82–91
go back to reference Lastova K, Nordvall M, Walters-Edwards M et al (2018) Cardiac autonomic and blood pressure responses to an acute foam rolling session. J Strength Cond Res 32:2825–2830CrossRefPubMed Lastova K, Nordvall M, Walters-Edwards M et al (2018) Cardiac autonomic and blood pressure responses to an acute foam rolling session. J Strength Cond Res 32:2825–2830CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Okamoto T, Masuhara M, Ikuta K (2013) Acute effects of self-myofascial release using a foam roller on arterial function. J Strength Cond Res 28:69–73CrossRef Okamoto T, Masuhara M, Ikuta K (2013) Acute effects of self-myofascial release using a foam roller on arterial function. J Strength Cond Res 28:69–73CrossRef
go back to reference Saccò M, Meschi M, Regolisti G et al (2013) The relationship between blood pressure and pain. J Clin Hypertens 15:600–605CrossRef Saccò M, Meschi M, Regolisti G et al (2013) The relationship between blood pressure and pain. J Clin Hypertens 15:600–605CrossRef
Metadata
Title
Acute self-myofascial release modulates cardiac autonomic function and hemodynamic parameters at rest and reduces cardiovascular stress reaction
Authors
Sascha Ketelhut
Livia Oechslin
Cäcilia Zehnder
Claudia Kubica
Claudio R. Nigg
Publication date
29-12-2023
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Keyword
Massage
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology / Issue 5/2024
Print ISSN: 1439-6319
Electronic ISSN: 1439-6327
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-023-05382-2

Other articles of this Issue 5/2024

European Journal of Applied Physiology 5/2024 Go to the issue