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29-05-2024 | Hematologic Cancer

Use of Patient-Centered Technology and Digital Interventions in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

Authors: Rachel S. Werk, Mallorie B. Heneghan, Sherif M. Badawy

Published in: Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports

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Abstract

Purpose of Review

As society continues to advance in technology, it is important to address how this advancement can impact and enhance patient care. The purpose of this review is to identify patient-centered technology currently available for adult and pediatric patients with and those having survived hematologic malignancies. Given that patients with hematologic malignancies often have to adhere to strenuous medication regimens, coordinate care with many different providers, manage symptoms associated with treatment, and manage late effects associated with survivorship, they would benefit greatly from patient-centered technology aimed at decreasing these burdens.

Recent Findings

This review found various available digital interventions for this patient population and focuses on an overview of commercially available smartphone applications, patient portals, and technology for remote monitoring.

Summary

In summary, many digital interventions exist for use in the medical care of oncology patients. The incorporation of these interventions can allow for more personalized medical care, better organization of treatment plans by caregivers at home, and easy delivery of accurate medical information.
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Metadata
Title
Use of Patient-Centered Technology and Digital Interventions in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies
Authors
Rachel S. Werk
Mallorie B. Heneghan
Sherif M. Badawy
Publication date
29-05-2024
Publisher
Springer US
Published in
Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports
Print ISSN: 1558-8211
Electronic ISSN: 1558-822X
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11899-024-00732-z