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Published in: Journal of General Internal Medicine 11/2022

Open Access 21-03-2022 | Research and Reporting Methods

Evaluating Health Literacy in Virtual Environments: Validation of the REALM and REALM-Teen for Virtual Use

Authors: Julie L Aker, MT (ASCP), Terry C Davis, PhD, Andrea Leonard-Segal, MD, Lori Christman, PhD, Sara Travis, BS, Melissa Beck, BA, Angela Newton, MBA

Published in: Journal of General Internal Medicine | Issue 11/2022

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Excerpt

It is important to include populations of diverse literacy levels in healthcare research. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic highlighted the need for virtual approaches to evaluate health literacy for research studies including those focused on drug development for potential FDA approval. We were unable to find evidence of a validated methodology to assess health literacy during video visits or on mobile devices. …
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Metadata
Title
Evaluating Health Literacy in Virtual Environments: Validation of the REALM and REALM-Teen for Virtual Use
Authors
Julie L Aker, MT (ASCP)
Terry C Davis, PhD
Andrea Leonard-Segal, MD
Lori Christman, PhD
Sara Travis, BS
Melissa Beck, BA
Angela Newton, MBA
Publication date
21-03-2022
Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Published in
Journal of General Internal Medicine / Issue 11/2022
Print ISSN: 0884-8734
Electronic ISSN: 1525-1497
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-022-07474-9

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